Monthly Archives: May 2019

Growing Pains: VR Ecosystem Changes for 2019

In the first four months of 2019, we have already seen significant changes within the virtual reality ecosystem. Although there is much anticipation and excitement for the Oculus Quest standalone headset (releasing on May 21st), other developments have raised warnings and concerns about VR in general.

The first of these concerns relates to social VR. Both High Fidelity and Sansar have decided to back off from VR in their respective platforms. Many VR enthusiasts believe that social VR is critical for the creation of the “metaverse” — essentially a virtual reality version of the Internet, where people will communicate, work, and play in VR.

Not all social VR platforms are going away. AltSpace VR, Bigscreen Beta, RecRoom and VRChat are still active at the moment. Facebook also remains committed to its social platforms such as Oculus Rooms and Oculus Venues.

Changes are also happening for Mobile VR. Since the release of the Oculus Go standalone headset last year, the appeal of smartphone-based VR has steadily declined. Mobile headsets such as Google Daydream and Samsung Gear VR have essentially gone by the wayside. Originally a stop-gap solution, they inevitably became obsolete when the all-in-one mobile headsets became available.

Gear VR2

Finally, Facebook continues to make changes in their management team, while remaining enthusiastic for standalone VR (and possibly re-thinking their approach for high-end tethered headsets such as the Oculus Rift S.)

All of these changes are essential growing pains for a technology that is still seeking its “sweetspot” with consumers. Perhaps the Oculus Quest will be the device that finally causes VR to go mainstream. If not, it’s only a matter of time before there will be another.

 

Roy Kachur is a Media Technologist, IT Architect, and VR Evangelist. He has worked in the information technology field since the 1990’s, and in the media industry since 2014. He believes that VR will play a significant role in the future of media.

Oculus Quest Review Round-up

The Oculus Quest standalone VR headset will be available on May 21st. Many reviewers have already given their take on this exciting new device. See below for a collection of the latest reviews:

c|net: Facebook’s new VR headset it the best thing I’ve tried this year

Digital Trends: With the cord-free Quest, Oculus finally makes high-quality VR easy

Engadget: Oculus Quest review: VR freedom comes at a cost

Game Informer: Oculus Quest review: The next step for VR

GameSpot: Oculus Quest review: No PC? No problem

IGN: Oculus Quest review: A new reality

Mashable: Oculus Quest review: A new milestone for VR

PCMAG.COM: Oculus Quest Review and Rating

PIVIRAL: The Best VR Headset of 2019

Pocket-lint: A cable-free VR experience that’s surprisingly satisfying

RoadToVR: Oculus Quest Review: The First Great Standalone VR Headset

TechRadar: Oculus Quest review: An all-in-one virtual reality system for everyone

Tom’s Guide: Oculus Quest Hands-on: The New King of Mobile VR

Trusted Reviews: The Oculus Quest offers an exciting future for VR after shaking free its wired shackles

The Verge: Oculus Quest review: a great system with a frustrating compromise

Wareable: Goodbye wires, hello total freedom

WIRED: Oculus Quest review: VR has never felt this free

 

Roy Kachur is a Media Technologist, IT Architect, and VR Evangelist. He has worked in the information technology field since the 1990’s, and in the media industry since 2014. He believes that VR will play a significant role in the future of media.

 

Gymnasia VR Review: Unique and Creepy Stop-Motion Puppetry

Gymnasia, the latest project from Felix & Paul Studios, recently debuted at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York City. It’s also available for viewing at home on Oculus VR headsets, for the price of $4.99.

Clocking in at around six minutes, this short film is strange but engaging, presented in a gothic style that is creepy but not scary. Fans of Tim Burton will definitely enjoy the experience, but it’s worth seeing by anyone interested in cinematic VR and/or animated films.

Although there is not much of a plot, this VR experience is very atmospheric and effective. Set in an abandoned school gymnasium, creepy music plays while children’s shadows appear on the walls around you. Soon a basketball starts bouncing on its own, followed by many more of them, as their sounds reverberate from the walls. Eventually, you are introduced to a pair of animated dolls dressed in gothic outfits, who engage in a bizarre musical performance.

Gymnasia

As with any stop-motion projects, it’s clear that a lot of time and creative energy was spent on this project. The attention to detail of the miniatures is remarkable, and VR enables a close-up view of the artistry at work. I only wish it was longer, with more of a story. Hopefully there will be more to come in the future.

Here is a behind the scenes look at the making of this project:

More information is available at the Oculus Store:

Step into the stillness of an abandoned school and enter GYMNASIA, a place where the ghostly ephemera of a lost childhood await you. Recall the particular sights and sounds of a child’s world through the echoes of ball games, school lessons and choir recitals. GYMNASIA reanimates the memories of those forgotten days.

This ground-breaking, cinematic VR experience is the first collaboration between the National Film Board of Canada, Felix & Paul Studios and Clyde Henry Productions. Blending 3D 360-degree video, stop-motion, miniatures and CGI, GYMNASIA pushes the art of puppet animation into uncharted territory. The first VR experience to induce the elusive anxiety that occurs when the lines between what’s real and unreal are blurred beyond belief, GYMNASIA is a dark dream–unsettling and weirdly wonderful. Duration: 6 minutes 29 seconds.

 

Roy Kachur is a Media Technologist, IT Architect, and VR Evangelist. He has worked in the information technology field since the 1990’s, and in the media industry since 2014. He believes that VR will play a significant role in the future of media.