Monthly Archives: June 2019

VR Review: Dreamscape at Westfield Century City, Los Angeles

During my recent trip to Los Angeles for the DelliVR conference, I had the opportunity to visit Dreamscape at the Westfield Century City shopping mall. Much like the VOID, Dreamscape is a location-based virtual reality attraction that offers three different immersive experiences, for the price of $20 each. I was able to attend two of the three adventures currently available.

Please note, the review below contains minor SPOILERS.

Alien Zoo

20190621_120603The lobby of Dreamscape is welcoming and pleasant, with lots of props and photos available to set the mood for what you are about to experience. I had purchased my ticket previously, so registration at the front desk took just a few minutes, and I was able to choose my avatar model for each adventure. After registration, I waited in the main lobby until my departure time, where I had some time to peruse the artwork and props on display.

When my “boarding time” arrived, I was escorted with five other “travellers” to a boarding area where we were each assigned a seat and instructed to put on our gear. The equipment consisted of an Oculus Rift headset, a backpack PC, and wireless trackers for our hands and feet. This is notably different from the VOID, which only requires a headset and backpack.

The attendant made sure we were suited up properly, then brought us into the next room for our VR adventure. We were asked to line up on one side of the room, each of us on a set of footprints marked on the floor. With our headsets on, we were soon able to see our virtual selves in VR. The tracking worked perfectly, even when we were asked to shake hands with the person next to us.

20190621_120631Finally, the adventure began. In virtual reality, we appeared to be standing on a platform surrounded by a railing (which we could hold onto if needed). Guided by a narrator who described what we would see and provided instructions via our earphones, we were shortly transported to another planet.

Our platform floated forward across the landscape, past various flora and fauna of an alien world. There were huge dinosaur-like creatures which provided a true sense of wonder similar to a scene from Jurassic Park. Colorful plant life and smaller animals were also there, and there were a few opportunities to interact with the creatures and objects in specific scenes.

The final scene is a bit more action oriented, as a larger creature appears to attack the vehicle. Being a family-friendly attraction, it’s more exciting than scary. The relatively short (around 12 minutes) adventure was a truly magical experience. I highly recommend it for anyone who has never experienced VR before, as well as for VR enthusiasts.

Curse of the Lost Pearl: A Magic Projector Adventure

20190621_120246The second attraction I experienced was more of an Indiana Jones-style adventure, set in the past. The concept is that an inventor has created a “magic projector” that enables viewers to go inside a motion picture. The effect to create this illusion is truly remarkable in VR, and I won’t spoil it here.

The initial setup was the same as with Alien Zoo. However, once the experience begins the group has more freedom to navigate the virtual environment and participate in the story. At one point, the group was split in half, and it appeared as if we were separated by a great distance across a chasm.

More interactivity is provided in this experience (compared to Alien Zoo), and a fast paced vehicle ride at the end provides an exciting climax.

Again, highly recommended!

Comparison to The VOID

I have previously reported about my visits to The VOID (Star Wars: Secrets of the Empire and Nicodemus: Demon of Evanishment). Both of these are extremely high quality VR attractions, similar to those at Dreamscape. However, there are notable differences in the venue, setup, and overall experience provided by each.

Dreamscape has devoted much more attention to the lobby and outdoor area of their venue. The lobby itself includes many props and artifacts from each of the adventures available, getting you into the mood before beginning your adventure. The VOID has a much smaller lobby, with little to look at other than a few souvenirs available for purchase.

Dreamscape also provides more instruction and attention for users, while suiting up in the VR equipment. This makes sense, since there are more external trackers required to be worn. The VOID does not require trackers for your hands or feet.

Finally, Dreamscape’s attractions seem to offer more freedom of movement, in the sense that participants are able to walk freely on the virtual platforms, while the adventure unfolds around you in VR. At the VOID, your actions are more “directed” with less freedom of choice. Both of these approaches work very well, and neither is necessarily “better” than the other.

Ultimately, both Dreamscape and The VOID are able to offer cutting-edge location based VR experiences of the highest quality. This level of room-scale VR simply cannot be experienced at home. I hope to see many more VR attractions in the months and years ahead from both of these establishments.

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Roy Kachur is a Media Technologist, IT Architect, and VR Evangelist. He has worked in the information technology field since the 1990’s, and in the media industry since 2014. He believes that VR will play a significant role in the future of media.

Back to the VOID: A scary good time in VR with Nicodemus, Demon of Evanishment

In June 2019, I had the opportunity to visit The VOID in Glendale, California for their VR attraction Nicodemus: Demon of Evanishment. A very strange name, but a very worthwhile VR experience!

This was not my first time to the VOID. I had experienced their Ghostbusters attraction in NYC as well as Star Wars: Secrets of the Empire in both Orlando and Anaheim. But I had heard good things about Nicodemus, which is a very different experience (more horror than action/adventure). It’s not recommended for young children, because it has some disturbing images and quite a few jump scares.

I was not disappointed. Here is a rundown of the experience, which may contain a few SPOILERS.

Back in time

20190624_053613After checking in at the front desk, you get to choose a character by picking a physical card representing your role in the experience. (As a nice bonus, you get to keep the card as a souvenir of your visit.) After selecting your character and watching an introductory video, you are escorted into a setup area where you and up to three friends are instructed to put on your VR gear (a customized flip-up style Oculus Rift headset with headphones, tethered to a backpack PC). After everyone is suited up, you are led to the start position for your adventure, and asked to lower your headset and have fun!

The overall concept is a trip back in time to the Chicago Word’s Fair in 1893. There was an exhibit known as “Electro-Spiritualism” which allowed visitors to experience various effects related to spirituality and technology. Kind of a paranormal idea, which many people believed in at the time. The attraction at the fair was a moving platform that would take visitors past different scenes, with animatronic figures representing different ideas. (I know this is a very vague description, but I want to avoid spoilers). Here is more “official” info from the VOID’s website:

In the summer of 1893, the World’s Columbian Exposition – aka the Chicago World’s Fair – was held on the south side of Chicago. Three days before the fair closed, a tragic demonstration in the Electro-Spiritualism exhibit brought something terrible into our world.

Word spread that an unknown creature was luring guests down to an ‘Evanishment Room’ from which they never returned. The attractions were quickly and quietly closed. Workmen refused to dismantle the exhibits as the fair died around it. Two months later on January 4, 1894, strange lights were seen coming from the abandoned exhibit hall.

You and up to three friends or family will travel back over one hundred twenty years to that night at the decaying Chicago World’s Fair. You will choose one of six personas through which you will discover frights, trials, and adventure around every corner. Your goal is simple: explore the abandoned exhibits and don’t get caught by the demon… Nicodemus.

The best way to describe it is a Victorian era horror experience, with an aesthetic very similar to the video game BioShock (more specifically BioShock 2, which has a similar scene where you move on a ride vehicle through an abandoned museum exhibit).

The exhibit has deteriorated over time, with most of the figures and features looking old and decrepit. Lighting and sound are used to great effect, to facilitate multiple jump scares throughout the experience. There is also a CREATURE. (That’s all I will say on that topic!).

Puzzles and jump scares

There are some puzzle aspects to the experience, in which you have to manipulate objects in order to proceed to the next scene. Nothing too complex, but interactive enough to make it interesting. The experience includes multiple room-scale VR scenes, which may involve standing, sitting, and/or walking short distances. The VR effects make the overall environment seem much larger than the actual physical location. For example, in the first scene your ride vehicle appears to move forward in VR, but you are really standing in one place in the real world. At one point, you appear to descend on an elevator for many hundreds of feet, but in reality you haven’t moved at all.

The climax involves some very cool effects with the CREATURE (no spoilers). Overall, for people who are affected by darkness and/or jump scares, this experience will be scary as hell. I heard many screams from a family in front of me who were going through the attraction before me. Personally, I enjoy horror films that are creepy/spooky but not gory.  This attraction fits perfectly with that description.

Bonus content

Interestingly, there is much more info (including a complete short story!) providing more info on the VOID’s website.

Nicodemus: Demon of Evanishment is a unique and beautifully designed experience that I highly recommend. It’s a much slower-paced attraction compared to other VR experiences at the VOID, and a very enjoyable “funhouse” experience not to be missed!

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Roy Kachur is a Media Technologist, IT Architect, and VR Evangelist. He has worked in the information technology field since the 1990’s, and in the media industry since 2014. He believes that VR will play a significant role in the future of media.